HEALTH EDUCATION



Ten Super Foods to EAT

According to EatingWell.com, these are the ten super foods which can keep eating healthy simple:

1. Berries
2. Eggs
3. Beans
4. Nuts
5. Oranges
6. Sweet Potatoes
7. Broccoli
8. Tea
9. Spinach
10. Yogurt
Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com





Just what is a Parish Nurse?

According to the Canadian Association for Parish Nursing Ministry (www.capnm.ca), Parish Nursing is a health ministry of faith communities which emphasizes the wholeness of body, mind and spirit. Rooted in the vision of Christ as Healer, this ministry grows out of the belief that all faith communities are places of health and healing and have a role in promoting wholeness through the integration of faith and health.

A Parish Nurse is a registered nurse with specialized knowledge, who is called to ministry and affirmed by a faith community to promote health, healing and wholeness. The role of a Parish Nurse is to promote the integration of faith and health in a variety of ways that reflect the context of a specific faith community. My role at St. Peter's aims at involving more people in the health and healing ministry. As your Parish nurse, I am only one component of St Peter's health ministry. The Health and Healing Committee as well as the Pastoral Care committee are great support to me.

As in all ministry, the work of the Parish Nurse is never finished. Some examples include the following:

1. Spiritual care - e.g. be available at church and retirement home worship services and afterwards, counselling, etc.
2. Health advocacy - e.g. making presentations re: healthy living and other health issues to church and community groups, ,trying to enable parishioners to navigate our community health systems, etc.
3. Health counselling - e.g. holding Friday clinics, Blood pressure clinics, phone calls, e-mails, home visits, etc.
4. Health education - e.g. writing articles in Sunday bulletins and Keynotes magazine, involvements in Community wellness fairs, and working alongside the Health sub-committee for education.
5. Visitations - e.g. making some hospital, residential care and home visits, phone calls, etc.
6. Support groups - e.g. in touch with cancer support group, friends at 10, tea & coffee time, and Parish Nurse support group, etc.
7. Resource referral - e.g. making calls to hospital, doctor, physiotherapy, chiropractor, counselling, and social service offices, etc.
8. Administration - staff meetings, paperwork, phone calls, e-mails, etc.
9. Professional development - e.g. attending Parish Nurses' regional support meetings, retreats, workshops, and conferences, teleconferences, webinars (web-based seminars), etc.

A community of more and more people with a balanced spiritual, emotional, mental and physical health will no doubt further the advance of the Kingdom of God in our area.

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com





Put Fish On Your Dish

A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that eating salmon and other fish high in omega-3 fatty acids once or twice a week can cut the risk of death from heart disease by about a third (Focus on Healthy Aging, p. 22).

Cold-water fish such as salmon and herring are best because they have high levels of omega-3 fatty acids and low levels of mercury.Many shellfish, such as shrimp, clams, and oysters, contain undetectable levels of mercury. Catfish, flounder, Pollock, and cod are also good choices. Tuna is high in mercury levels, so limit consumption to once a week.

Eat canned light tuna instead of albacore tuna, since albacore tuna is more likely to accumulate mercury. Stay away from large fish such as shark, swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish, which have the highest mercy levels. Please note that farm-raised fish may have higher levels of contaminants due to toxins present in their feed.

Fish is not the only source of omega-3 fatty acids. Other sources include flaxseed, canola oil, and broccoli. Fish-oil supplements containing omega-3 fatty acids are also available and are a good alternative for people who do not like fish. Before taking fish-oil supplements, talk to your doctor about the right dose and a reputable manufacturer.

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Walking for Your Health

May I add one more to your New Year's Resolutions - walking? When the weather is nice and warmer, there are a lot of places we can walk in our area. In the winter, the Cobourg Community Centre offers an excellent indoor walking track for all walkers - fast and slow.

Walking not only trims your waistline, but improves your health in general. There are many benefits of daily brisk walk:

1. Maintains healthy weight.
2. Prevents or manages conditions like heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes.
3. Strengthens your bones.
4. Lifts your mood.
5. Improves balance and coordination.

Once you have decided that your destination is to improve your health in general, start walking about at least two and half hours every week. Starting a new resolution takes initiative. Sticking to it takes commitment. Staying motivated is a key to your success.

Just a word about fitness walking. Stand tall and relaxed, swing arms with elbow slightly bent, stomach muscle tightened, back straight, and walk smoothly are all good components of fitness walking.

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




It's That Time Again!

The cold and flu season is once again haunting us. Community flu shot clinics are being held. Please check with your pharmacist if you have not yet had your immunization.

As for all seasons, effective hand-washing needs to be done. We cannot see germs, so we need to wash our hands often and properly. Our hands spread 80% of common infections but these germs can be easily removed with soap, water and good technique.

Six steps include:

1. Wet hands.
2. Apply soap.
3. Rub hands together as well as washing backs of hands and between fingers for 15-20 seconds (sing "Row, Row, Row Your Boat" two times).
4. Rinse well.
5. Towel dry.
6. Turn taps off with towel.

Wash your hands before you handle food, eat or drink or feed a baby/child. Wash your hands after you use the washroom, handle uncooked foods, change a diaper, blow your nose, cough or sneeze, handle garbage, or touch an animal. Please wash your hands, wash your hands, wash your hands!

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Fish on Your Plate

In recent years, new research has shown that omega fats in our diet are a healthy ... as well as tasty ... addition to our diets.

A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that eating salmon and other fish high in omega-3 fatty acids once or twice a week can cut the risk of death from heart disease by about a third (Focus on Healthy Aging, p. 22).

Cold-water fish such as salmon and herring are best because they have high levels of omega-3 fatty acids and low levels of mercury. Many shellfish, such as shrimp, clams, and oysters, contain undetectable levels of mercury. Catfish, flounder, Pollock, and cod are also good choices. Tuna is high in mercury levels, so limit consumption to once a week.

Eat canned light tuna instead of albacore tuna, since albacore tuna is more likely to accumulate mercury. Stay away from large fish such as shark, swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish, which have the highest mercy levels. Please note that farm-raised fish may have higher levels of contaminants due to toxins present in their feed.

Fish is not the only source of omega-3 fatty acids. Other sources include flaxseed, canola oil, and broccoli. Fish-oil supplements containing omega-3 fatty acids are also available and are a good alternative for people who do not like fish. Before taking fish-oil supplements, talk to your doctor about the right dose and a reputable manufacturer.

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Good Health Is Important

Good health is something we often take for granted - until we start to lose it. The laws given by God to Moses contain rules pertaining to public health which concern us, even today: water and food contamination, sewage disposal, infectious diseases, and health education. We are very thankful that modern medical science has discovered many principles of good health. Most importantly, we must not forget that God designed and created the miracle that is the human body.

Our thoughts, moods, emotions, and belief system have an impact on some of the body's basic health and healing mechanisms. Laughter, prayer, meditation, play, humor, and regular worship attendance contribute to good health. Laughter, celebration and festivity may be the catalyst for reducing the negative effects of living a stressful life in today's society. Our physical health is closely related to the mental, emotional, social, and spiritual state of the individual. If treatment is needed for an illness, these treatments need to support the body's natural healing system.

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




The Movember Movement

The Movember movement was born in Australia in 2004. It has spread throughout the world with the goal of educating men about prostate cancer and getting men to act. Thus, it will increase the chance of early detection, diagnosis and early treatment. Its goal is "changing the face of men's health, one moustache at a time".

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Canadian men. If a man is over 65 years old, has a family history, African ancestry, or indulges in a high-fat diet, he is at a higher risk. A simple blood test - "PSA" - and a more intrusive digital rectal examination can lead to early detection. Symptoms of prostate cancer include changes in bladder habits such as frequency (especially at night), urgency, burning or pain, difficulty with urine flow, and the feeling of incomplete emptying of bladder. Blood in urine or semen, or painful ejaculation, conclude the list.

When should a man initially talk to his physician? If he is 50 years or older or has any of the above symptoms, he should request testing. Prostate cancer tends to grow slowly and can often be cured or managed successfully when caught early.

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Healthy Restaurant Eating

Most of us eat in restaurants occasionally. It can be a pleasant treat, but generally these meals are very high in salt, high in fat, and low in fiber. Therefore, people who have diseases related to cholesterol, fat, and sugar intake, need to to watch what they eat in restaurants.

Here are some tips to help you make better restaurant choices:

1. Before you go out, visit the restaurant's website and plan your meal based on the nutritional information.
2. Don't overdose on protein.Each serving of chicken or beef you eat should be no bigger than a deck of cards or the palm of your hand.
3. Get your entree grilled, steamed, broiled, or poached rather than fried, and you will avoid a lot of fat and unnecessary calories.
4. Eat your veggies. Order steamed broccoli, spinach, or beans.
5. Don't be afraid to change the recipe on high-fat entrees. If a dish comes with sour cream, ask for salsa instead.

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com





FIVE Ways Pumpkins Boost Your Health

I personally love pumpkin and eat it throughout the year but for many they are just for jack-o-lanterns and harvest decoration. Pumpkins are a very nutritional and valuable vegetables. Find a recipe to prepare and enjoy!

There are five ways pumpkins may boost your health:

1. High in Vitamin A. Vitamin A acts as a protective antioxidant.
2. High in fibre, especially when pureed.
3. Low in calories.
4. Contain healthy seeds. They contain zinc and Vitamin E (another antioxidant).
5. For pet lovers, pure pumpkin (no additives like sugar and not baked) can help a dog or cat's digestive system.

P.S. A pumpkin rind contains proteins that may inhibit the growth of germs. Thus, it will have an antibiotic effect.


Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Apples, Anyone?

According to Jill Buchner (Canadian Living, September 29, 2014), there are ten reasons why we should eat an apple everyday:

1. Apples' pectin (a soluble fibre) can lower our cholesterol.
2. The peel prevents weight gain. Ursolic acid protects against obesity.
3. The apple's fibre + 80% water content satisfy our hunger. Also pectin is a natural appetite suppressant, making apples a natural snack.
4. Eating apples helps clean our teeth.
5. Apples may lower our risk for Type 2 diabetes.
6. Soluble fibre encourages our bodies to make an anti-inflammatory protein which protects us from sickness.
7. An apple's nutrients, Vitamin C, and fibre could reduce our cancer risk.
8. Apples boost good gut bacteria. They become a natural probiotic, improving our digestion.
9. Apples are associated with better breathing.
10. In a 2013 study, researchers stated that up to 11,000 heart-related deaths could be prevented yearly in United Kingdom if everyone over age 50 would eat an apple everyday.

No wonder, our mothers were right in saying "An apple a day keeps the doctor away".


Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




End of Earthly Life Issues

Most of us do experience some kind of pain in our life journey, some more severe than others. What are we going to do for those who are experiencing extreme pain with no hope of recovery? Is euthanasia a violation of the Sixth Commandment, "Thou shalt not kill"?

A survey in the United States of more than 10,000 physicians stated that about 46% of them agree that physician-assisted suicide should be allowed in some cases, 41% do not, and the remaining 14% think, "it depends" (Leslie Kane's Doctors Struggle With Tougher-Than-Ever Dilemmas: Other Ethical Issues, November 11, 2010).

Please note that God has no beginning and no ending; humans have a beginning but no ending. We are great because God has created and re-created us. All of us are special in God's sight.

May I draw your attention to an upcoming conference on the end of earthly life issues, to be held at the Fellowship Baptist Church Gym on Saturday October 18. All are welcome!

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Flu Vaccine for You or Me?

It's that time again! While 10-20% of Canadians catch the flu each year, 12,200 are hospitalized and 3,500 will die. Rates of infection are highest in children 5-9 years of age. The symptoms are more serious in children under 2, and those over 65 and people with underlying medical conditions.

Flu symptoms include sudden onset of fever, cough, sore throat, muscular aches, and fatigue, loss of appetite, running or stuffy nose, nausea/vomiting/diarrhea, especially in children. Most people recover in 7-10 days. The sickness is spread by droplets - coughing or sneezing or direct or indirect contact with contaminated respiratory secretions. The incubation period is usually 1-4 days.

Prevention is very important and the best way influenza can be prevented is to be vaccinated. Health Canada recommends that anyone older than six months should be immunized.

What does the flu vaccine do? It protects you if you are exposed to the influenza virus and prevents you from passing on the virus to others. You need a new flu vaccine every year. The affects wears off and the viruses it affects varies from year to year. You cannot get the flu from the vaccine but it may cause mild fatigue. Various flu clinics will be held in Cobourg. Please check the local newspapers.


Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Salt and High Blood Pressure

Salt attracts water. When there is too much salt in the blood, the salt draws more water into the blood. More water increases the volume of blood which raises blood pressure.

You need about 500 milligrams (mg) of salt everyday for your body to function. Most people take in about ten times that amount daily. The recommended amount of salt for people with high blood pressure is about 1,500 mg a day. Any reduction in your salt intake will help.

Salt can be hidden in many processed foods. It is the manufacturer's way of making these items more tastier. A healthier way of eating is to try to eat mostly produce, fruits, and fresh meat. Try to avoid condiments, pickles, ham, bacon, salsa, cheese, cold cuts, olives, broths, anything canned, and anything processed. Reading the product's food label should become a routine before purchasing any of these products. Check the sodium content on food labels and think twice about anything with over 150 mg per serving. A few of these items are okay everyday, but in moderation.


Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Be an Organ Donor!

Today, there are about 4,500 Canadians listed on the organ transplant list and most of them are waiting for a new kidney. About 2,000 Canadians spend up to three years on the list waiting for a corneal transplant.

In 2012, a total of 2,125 organs were transplanted, while 256 people died waiting for a match. As our population ages, need for viable organ and tissue can only increase.

Why should we consider being an organ donor? A single donor may save as many as eight lives and may also improve the quality of live for 75 others.

Who can donate? First, discuss this important subject with your family ... those left behind will make the final decision. Anyone has the potential to donate upon dying. Age is less important than the health of organs/tissues. Here is our reward: Since the successful rate of transplant is excellent, we know that many may enjoy increased quality of life.

Although 85% of Ontarians are in favour of donating their organs, only 25% actually register their consent. You may register by using the Ontario Organ and Tissue Donor Registration web page.


Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Don't Forget Your Breakfast

When a child wakes up, he or she could have been fasting for up to 12 hours. This alone makes a healthy breakfast as important as new clothes, new backpacks, and other school supplies as another school year begins.

Studies have shown that a nutritious breakfast helps students of all ages stay alert in class. They are also more creative and have improved memory, problem-solving, and verbal skills as well as higher self-esteem and better attendance records.

Just what constitutes a healthy breakfast? Dieticians suggest one item from three food groups on Canada's Food Guide makes this very important meal nutritious.

If mornings seem too hectic for a proper breakfast, start preparation the night before. Set the table, plan a menu, choose clothes, and pack backpacks and lunches, leaving time to enjoy this important time of day.

"Monkey see monkey do". Parents also need to start their day with a healthy breakfast. This may improve their day as well as encourage good health habits in their children for a lifetime.


Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




A Healthy Diet For You

I hope that all of you enjoyed a restful and enjoyable summer. We all eat differently during the warmer months. Even the advent of fresh, local produce doesn't guarantee healthy choices. Perhaps this is the time to look at healthier eating as we settle back into our routines. A nutritionally healthy diet consists of eating the following:

1.More fruits and vegetables, especially dark green, red, and orange vegetables.
2.More whole grains (e.g. 100% whole-grain cereal, bread, rice, and pasta).
3.Less meat, leaner meat, and only small portions of meat.
4.More fish and seafood (aim for twice a week).
5.More beans and lentils, for fiber and protein.
6.Less saturated fat (e.g. cookies, ice cream, cheese).
7.Less salt.
8.Low-fat dairy products (which have as much calcium but less fat and fewer calories than higher fat products).

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Tips for Travel When You Are A Diabetic

Summertime can mean more travel and time spent away from home and routines. It can be especially challenging for diabetics. Here are the 12 travel tips from the April-May 2014 issue of Diabetes Health (pp. 8-9):

1.Visit your doctor.
2.Get a letter. A doctor's note can come in handy when going through airport security or in another country if healthcare services are needed.
3.Pack more supplies than you will need.It might be helpful to include a card with name, phone # and e-mail on it in case luggage gets lost.
4.Prepare for airport security.Pack supplies separately so staff can see them. Take special care if you use an insulin pump. Some scanners can cause problems.
5.Beware of time zones. A couple of hours may need only minimal adjustment. Many hours will take planning in advance.
6.Insulin concentration could be different outside Canada & USA. Syringes must match insulin.
7.Keep insulin cool and secure.
8.Plan ahead. Know how to find a doctor.Mayo Clinic suggests International Association for Medical Assistance to Travellers (iamat.org).
9.Check blood sugar often. Stress, diet, and exercise may affect readings.
10.Watch the food. Portion sizes and carbohydrate counts may vary in unfamiliar foods.
11.Be open about your disease.
12.By planning ahead, you don't need to feel limited.Enjoy your adventure.

(Some of the above tips may apply to those who have heart disease, respiratory, or other chronic conditions.)

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Tips for Fathers / Men

On Sunday, June 15, we celebrate Father's Day. I suggest that is a good time to tell the fathers/men in our lives that we want them to live a long, happy and healthy life. Please share the following tips with them.

1. Maintain a healthy weight.
2.Eat a rainbow of colours.
3.Stay hydrated.
4.Find time for fitness and physical exercise.
5.Attempt to keep stress levels low (praying and meditation can ease pressure).
6.Stay connected - Having close ties with others is important to maintaining good mental health.
7.Get 7-9 hours of sleep nightly - one of the easiest ways to promote good health.
8.Laugh and laugh some more.Laughter may reduce stress hormones, lower blood pressure and boost the system.
9.Get regular health check-ups including vision and dental check-ups.

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




A Word About Shingles

Shingles and chickenpox are both caused by the same virus. Anyone experiencing chickenpox as a child may develop shingles since the virus does not leave your body but continues to live in some nerve cells. Researchers are unsure what causes the virus to reactivate but if it does, it results in shingles. There are about 130,000 new cases diagnosed every year in Canada. Most cases are in healthy, older adults, making age the greatest risk factor.

Shingles follow a pattern according to the nerve route affected. It is usually noted on one side of the body, face or neck. A few days after the mild-strong tingling or burning sensation is felt, a red rash appears. The rash will turn into fluid-filled blisters. Shingles, itself, is not contagious unless the exposed person has not had chickenpox.

It is important to see a doctor at the first sign of shingles. Antiviral medications can alleviate the symptoms if they are prescribed within 72 hours. Early treatment can help dry up blisters faster and prevent severe pain.

The most common complication of shingles is post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). It occurs if nerves are damaged during an outbreak of shingles. This results in severe chronic pain.

A vaccine is now available in Canada for people over 60 years of age. Although it reduces the chance of shingles by51%, the vaccine can help reduce the severity and duration of the illness if shingles do occur. A major roadblock is that it costs $200, a cost not covered by OHIP, and that it may need to be repeated in 7 years.

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Vaccinations That Are Recommended For Adults

1.Seasonal flu shot - To be given in October or November.
2.Pneumococcal vaccine - This is a one time needle for those over 65 or younger adults with high risk health conditions.
3.Tetanus and diphtheria (Td) - Booster shot every ten years.
4.Shingles (Herpes zoster) vaccine - Recommended for people 60 and over. It costs about $200 and is not covered by OHIP.
5.Vaccines for specific travel destinations - They are also not covered by OHIP.

Please speak to your doctor! Immunizations are not just for kids!

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Caregiving, Part I

Did you know that April 5 was National Caregivers Day? In 2012, an astounding 8 million family caregivers reported to Stats Canada that they were caring for children, spouses or other loved ones.That translates to 28% of our population (15 or older) are devoting 10-14 hours weekly. The Canadian Caregiver coalition says that these caregivers are "the invisible backbone of the health care system". It is estimated that they provide $25 billion in unpaid care every year.

What do caregivers look like? 54% are women, and 60% of reporting caregivers also had a paid job. 28% of all caregivers have a child under 18.48% are caring for parents. Most common tasks are providing transportation and doing household work.

Due to our aging population, longer life spans and the shift from institutional care to home care, statistics suggest more people are relying on help from family and friends.Jesus said in Matthew, "Whatever you did for the least of my sisters and brothers, you did for me".

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Caregiving, Part II

Although the opportunity to be a caregiver brings its rewards, it can also become exhausting, both physically and emotionally. One can become so involved with a loved one's health concerns, that his/her own health is neglected.

Ten signs of caregiver stress are:

1. Denial
2. Anger
3. Social withdrawal
4. Anxiety about the future
5. Depression or feelings of sadness and hopelessness
6. Exhaustion and lack of energy
7. Difficulty sleeping
8. Irritability or emotional overreactions
9. Lack of concentration
10. Health problems (such as headaches, backaches,
      hypertension and getting colds or flu more often)

Self-care needs to be on the list of a caregiver's priorities. Ask for help to avoid being the sole caregiver. Talk about your feelings to someone. Remember your own health needs. Try 30 minutes of physical activity and healthy eating everyday. Enjoy a hobby.

A study at John Hopkins stated that Caregiving can have a positive effect on a caregiver when it is done willingly, done on manageable levels and the person receiving care can express gratitude willingly.

Jesus said in Matthew, "Whatever you did for the least of my sisters and brothers, you did for me".

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Caregiving, Part III

On Sunday, May 11 we honour another important of caregivers - our mothers. Here is a poem by an unknown author:

I think God took the fragrance of a flower,
  A pure white flower which blooms not for world praise
But which makes sweet and beautiful some bower;
The compassion of the dew, which gently lays
  Reviving freshness on the fainting earth
And gives to all the tired things new birth;
The steadfastness and radiance of stars
  Which lift the soul above the confining bar;
The gladness of fair dawns; the sunset's peace;
Contentment which from "trivial rounds" asks no release;
The life which finds its greatest joy in deeds of love for others -
  I think God took these precious things and made of them the mothers.
Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




TEN BEST FOODS

Since 1971, the Centre for Science in the Public Interest has been a strong advocate for nutrition and health, food safety, alcohol policy, etc. Its newsletter, Nutrition Action Healthletter, has over 900,000 subscribers in North America. Its website lists the following ten best foods:

1. Sweet potatoes
2. Mangoes
3. Unsweetened Greek yogurt
4. Broccoli
5. Wild salmon
6. Whole-grain rye crackers
7. Garbanzo beans
8. Watermelon
9. Butternut squash
10. Leafy greens

For more information, please consult www.cspinet.org.

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Protect Your Heart ... Do Your Part!

Diabetes is one of the risk factors for heart disease. If you have diabetes, the Canadian Diabetes Association has come up with a plan to reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke:

A - Hemoglobin A1C - target is 7 or less
B - Blood Pressure - less than 130/80
C - Cholesterol - LDL < 2.0 - medication may be necessary
D - Drugs to protect your heart, such as blood pressure pills, cholesterol lowering pills, or Aspirin
E - Exercise/Eating - Healthy eating and regular exercise with a goal of maintaining a healthy body weight
S - Stop smoking and manage stress
Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Important Survey Findings

Good news released on February 3, 2014 showed that 90% of people presenting with a heart attack at a hospital survived their incident, while 80% of stroke victims survived as well.

These survivors were asked by the Heart & Stroke Foundation to do an online survey and 2,010 Canadians responded. The bad news is that more than half of them were failing to make and/or keep healthy lifestyle changes needed to reduce the risk of it happening again.

Dr. Beth Abramson, a Toronto cardiologist stated, "The problem is that many of us are at risk - and the people who have had a heart attack are at the greatest risk of recurring heart attacks - are not making the life style changes we need".

Initially a survivor will improve their eating habits and exercise more but our memories are short. Respondents did mention that encouraging support came from family and friends which made them more successful.

Healthy lifestyle changes need to become a part of all Canadians' long term plan!

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




Anxiety and Depression

"We all have mental health, just as we all have physical health. Mental health is more than an absence of mental illness. It's a state of wellbeing."
- Canadian Mental Health Association

Last Sunday's "Lunch & Learn" featured Jack Veitch, a health promoter from the Mental Health Association. Attended by nearly 40 people, the topic was well received. The relevance of mental illness was reflected in the comments and questions directed to the speaker. Like any other illness, mental Illness has touched all of us in some way.

When asked what was an important thing we could do for someone with mental illness, Jack Veitch replied that we should not label people with their illness (e.g. 'Joe is a schizophrenic'). Stigmatizing mental illness has been done by society for centuries. Mental illness is just that ... an illness.

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com




A Cold or the Flu?

Is it a cold or the flu? Knowing the difference is important! The common cold can lead to sinus congestion or earache. The influenza can lead to pneumonia and respiratory failure. It can worsen a chronic illness and can become life–threatening.

Here are the symptoms for having a cold: It is common for the person to have a runny, stuffy nose, sneezing, and sore throat. One may sometimes experience mild general aches and pains, fatigue and weakness, chest discomfort and coughing. It is unusual to experience extreme fatigue. It is rare to have fever or headache.

Here are the symptoms for having a flu: It is also common for the person to have a runny, stuffy nose, and sore throat. One may sometimes experience sneezing. Usually the person will have a headache, general aches and pains, chest discomfort, and coughing, and each symptom can be severe. Extreme fatigue usually occurs early and can be severe. Fatigue and weakness can be severe, and may last 2–3 weeks or more. Flu is usually accompanied by high fever (39–40 degrees C.) with sudden onset, lasting for 3–4 days.

Karen Li
Parish Nurse
karen54li@hotmail.com






Hand Hygiene

The cold and flu season is once again haunting us. Community flu shot clinics are being held. Please check our Health/Healing bulletin board if you have not had your immunization.

As for all seasons, effective hand–washing needs to be done. We cannot see germs, so we need to wash our hands often and properly. Our hands spread 80% of common infections but these germs can be easily removed with soap, water and good technique.

Six steps include: